September Horse History

1 -  1973 - Horse-racing jockey Braulio Baeza won two races at Belmont Park, New York. Baeza then boarded an airplane and flew to Liberty Bell race track in Philadelphia to ride Determined King to victory in the Kindergarten Stakes.

1881: The Dwyer Brothers' three-year-old Hindoo won his 19th consecutive race, a purse event at Sheepshead Bay. His winning streak was snapped six days later in the September Handicap at Sheepshead, in which he finished third.

1924: A French colt, Epinard, headed the field for the first of three Internationals, of progressively longer distances, to be run at Belmont Park, Aqueduct and Latonia. Epinard finished second in the six-furlong race, which was witnessed by the Prince of Wales, the future Edward VIII.

1947: With a victory by Armed in the Washington Park Handicap, Calumet Farm became the first stable to surpass $1 million in annual earnings. Calumet led all owners for 1947, with total earnings of $1,402,436.

2001: Jockey Tim Moccasin capped a streak of 14 consecutive victories, a North American record, at Marquis Downs in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. His fourteenth straight win came aboard Intricate Stitch in the fifth race.

2 -  1901: Seven-year-old Ogden won two races in a single day at Coney Island.

1984 - Jockey Larry Snyder rode Tennessee Rite to a nine-length win in the the Prelude Stakes for $50,000 at Louisiana Downs. It was Snyder's 5,000th career victory and came 24 years -- to the day -- after his first win in 1960.

2001: Hall of Fame trainer Jimmy Jones, best known as the conditioner of Citation, died at age 94 after a lengthy illness.

 3 -  1967 - The richest horse race in American history was run. The All-American Futurity, a race for quarter horses, was held in New Mexico. Laico Bird won $225,000 of the $486,593 purse.

 1956: Swaps ended his racing career with a victory in the Washington Park Handicap at Washington Park. He was subsequently named Horse of the Year.

1956: Jockey John Longden surpassed Sir Gordon Richards' then-record number of wins when he rode Arrogate to victory in the Del Mar Handicap to attain his 4,871st victory.

1960: Kelso, ridden for the first time by Eddie Arcaro, won the Jerome Handicap.

2001: Jockey John Velazquez became the first jockey in history to ride six winners on a single card at Saratoga Racecourse.

2001: For the first time in Saratoga Racecourse history, attendance hit the million mark, with a total of 1,011,669 fans going through the turnstiles during the 36-day meet.

 4 -  1920: Man o’ War won the 1 5/8-mile Lawrence Realization Stakes at Belmont Park by 100 lengths, the largest winning margin in modern racing history. His time for the race, 2:40 4/5, shattered the world record by 6 4/5 seconds and was his fifth record-setting performance of that year.

1959: Allaire du Pont’s two-year-old Kelso won his maiden race by 1 1/4 lengths at Atlantic City. In the following year, Kelso was voted the first of his record five consecutive Horse of the Year titles

 5

 6

 7 1970 - Jockey Willie Shoemaker became the winningest horse-racing jockey by collecting win #6,033. 'The Shoe' earned his victory at Del Mar Race Track in Southern California -- passing the previous mark set by Johnny Longden.

 8 1990: Bill Shoemaker scored his first stakes victory as a trainer when he sent a five-year-old mare, Baldomero (IRE), to victory in the Osunitas Handicap at Del Mar.

1999: The Emirates Racing Association announced that the 2000 renewal of the Dubai World Cup would be worth $6 million.

2002: On his 41st birthday, Mario Pino became the 18th jockey to ride 5,000 winners by visiting the winner’s circle twice at Delaware Park. Pino got his 5,000 win when he guided Outdone to victory in the ninth race.

 9

 10 1999: Churchill Downs Incorporated completed its purchase of Hollywood Park Racetrack and Casino, including approximately 240 acres of land at the site in Inglewood, Calif.

 11 1976: In the third race at Latonia, jockey John Oldham and his wife, Suzanne Picou, became the first husband and wife riding team to compete in a parimutuel race together. Oldham finished second aboard Harvey's Hope and Picou rode My Girl Carla to an 11th-place finish.

1982: Jockey Earlie Fires had his 3,000th career win, aboard Volga Ace, in the fourth race at Arlington Park. 12 1973 - Horse race jockey Bill Shoemaker rode his 100th winner -- in a $100,000 stakes race. Shoemaker was aboard Such a Rush in the Del Mar Futurity at Del Mar, CA.

1944: A dead-heat for win and show occurred in the eighth race at Hawthorne.

1970: Nijinsky II won the St. Leger Stakes and became the 15th winner of England's triple crown. He is the last horse to have won the English triple.

1973: Fully recovered from a virus that had beset him at Saratoga, Secretariat worked five furlongs in :57 as his last preparation for the Marlboro Cup Invitational Handicap.

 2000: A colt by Storm Cat was purchased for $6.8 million at the Keeneland September Yearling Sale. It was the highest price paid for a yearling since 1985.

 13 1974: D. Wayne Lukas won his first Thoroughbred stakes victory, saddling his own three-year-old colt, Harbor Hauler, in the second division of the Foothill Stakes at Pomona to earn $6,312.

1989: Jockey Pat Day won eight of the day's nine races at Arlington International Racecourse. In his only loss, Day finished second on Wayne's by George.

 14 1853: West Australian won the St. Leger Stakes by three lengths and became England's first Triple Crown winner.

1959: The new $32 million Aqueduct, operated by the New York Racing Association, opened

2001: The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and Breeders' Cup Limited announced the formation of the NTRA Charities _ New York Heroes Fund to benefit the children and spouses of the firefighters, police officers, emergency workers and other victims who perished in the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. The organizations also dedicated the Oct. 27 Breeders' Cup World Thoroughbred Championships, to be run at Belmont Park to the memory of those slain and their survivors.

 15 1876: Isaac Murphy, one of the nation's greatest black jockeys, had his first career win, aboard Glentina, at the Kentucky Association meet in Lexington. Then known as Isaac Burns, Murphy later adopted the surname of his grandfather.

1973: Secretariat won the Marlboro Cup Invitational Handicap in the then-world record time of 1:45 2/5 for 1 1/8 miles. He defeated his stablemate, Riva Ridge, by 3 1/2 lengths. The winner's share of the purse, $150,000, made Secretariat a millionaire.

2001: Jockey Russell Baze, the fourth winningest rider in history behind only Laffit Pincay Jr., Bill Shoemaker and Pat Day, registered his 7,500th career victory after piloting Valid Double to victory in the third race at Bay Meadows racetrack in San Mateo, Calif.

 16 -  1972: Sent off at odds of 1-5, Secretariat won the Futurity Stakes at Belmont Park by 1 3/4 lengths, creating a minus show pool at the track of $4,985.

1978: For the first time in history, two Triple Crown winners met in a race, the Marlboro Cup at Belmont Park. Seattle Slew, the 1977 Triple Crown winner, defeated Affirmed, the 1978 Triple Crown winner, by three lengths.

1991: Jockey Jose Santos won his 2,000th career victory, aboard Sunny Sara at Belmont Park

2000: Keeneland successfully executed the Thoroughbred industry's first-ever Internet auction, selling four horses on-line for a total of $109,500. There were more than 200 buyers and agents registered to bid.

 17 -  1973: Penny Chenery announced that Secretariat would make his inaugural start on the turf in the Oct. 8 Man o' War Stakes at Belmont Park.

 18 1830 - A race was held between a horse and an iron horse. "Tom Thumb", the first locomotive built in America, was pitted against a real horse in a nine-mile course between Riley's Tavern and Baltimore. "Tom Thumb" suffered mechanical difficulties including a leaky boiler. If you had your money on the horse, you won! "Tom Thumb" lost by more than a nose.

1920: Carrying the top weight of his career, 138 pounds, three-year-old Man o' War won the Potomac Handicap, conceding 24 pounds to his nearest rival, Paul Jones, and 30 pounds to the second-place finisher, Wildair.

1943: The U.S. Army occupied the grounds of Hollywood Park as part of the war effort.

1999: Jockey David Gall retired as the fourth winningest rider of all time with 7,396 victories to his credit. 19 1943: Rider Eddie Arcaro returned to racing after a 12-month suspension that resulted from his attempt to injure a fellow rider in the Cowdin Stakes the previous year.

1942: Alsab, runner-up in the 1942 Kentucky Derby, beat 3-10 favorite Whirlaway, the 1941 Triple Crown champion, by a nose in a $25,000 match race at Narragansett Park. The match was arranged after Alsab was scratched from the Narragansett Special, a race won by Whirlaway one week earlier. Narragansett's president, James Dooley, offered to contribute the track's share of the mutuel handle, plus breakage, to the Army and Navy Relief Funds, making attendance at the race a patriotic gesture. Alsab and Whirlaway met twice more that year, with Whirlaway winning the Jockey Club Gold Cup on Oct. 3, and Alsab besting him in the New York Handicap on Oct. 10.

1997: Chelsea Zupan set an Emerald Downs record by winning seven consecutive races at the Auburn, Wash. oval. Zupan won four on September 18th and three on September 19th. The feat was a national record for consecutive victories by a female rider.

 20 1965: Jockey Jorge Velasquez made his American racing debut, riding for owner Fred W. Hooper, at Atlantic City Racecourse. He won with his first mount, aboard Keypoint, in the sixth race, at 8-1 odds.

1976: Two-year-old Seattle Slew made his racing debut, winning a six furlong maiden race by five lengths at Belmont Park. His zesty workouts prior to the race made Seattle Slew the 2-1 favorite and he was the public's choice in both his subsequent races that year. After only three starts (including the Champagne Stakes) in the space of 27 days, Seattle Slew was voted champion two-year-old colt for 1976.

 1980: Before a crowd of 23,000 spectators, four-year-old Spectacular Bid won the Woodward Stakes in the world's richest walkover. To the surprise of trainer Bud Delp and owners Harry, Teresa and Tom Meyerhoff, "Bid" was awarded only $73,300, which was half of the winner's share of the purse, but all that was allowable under the track's rules. There had not been a walkover in a major U.S. stakes race since Coaltown won the Edward Burke Handicap on April 23, 1949.

1999: Storm Cat's stud fee was raised from $200,000 to $300,000

2001: Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, Dubai's Crown Prince and Defense Minister of the United Arab Emirates, donated $5 million to a disaster relief fund, established by Keeneland, to assist those affected by the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11.

2001: Leading breeder Harry T. Mangurian, Jr., pledged $1 million to the National Thoroughbred Racing Association-New York Heroes Fund.

2001: Penske Auto Centers entered into a marketing agreement with the National Thoroughbred Racing Association and Breeders' Cup, giving the company entitlement rights to the $1 million Breeders' Cup Sprint 21 1938: A hurricane disrupted racing at Rockingham Park, which ended the day's program after the sixth race. Thirteen barns were destroyed during the storm.

1940: For the first time in the history of photo finishes a triple dead heat for first place was recorded, at Willow's Park, Victoria, British Columbia.

1973: Secretariat had his first workout on a turf course, going a half-mile in :48 3/5 at Belmont Park.

 22 1988: Stuart Symington Janney Jr., owner of Ruffian, died at age 81.

1996: Larry Ross trained the top four finishers in a seven-horse field for the Washington HBPA Stakes at Emerald Downs.

 23 1998: Clay Puett, who invented the electric starting gate more than 60 years ago, died at age 99.

2000: The 13-day Keeneland September Sale concluded with gross sales of $291,827,100, topping the previous mark of $233,020,800 set last year.

2001: The Keeneland September Yearling Sale, interrupted by the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., and conducted during a climate of global economic uncertainty, ended with the second highest gross and average receipts in its history.

 24 1943: The Jockey Club announced the creation of The Jockey Club Foundation, which was established to aid indigent members of the racing community.

 25 1866: Jerome Park, named for its founder, Leonard W. Jerome, opened in the Bronx, N.Y. The track was a magnet for New York's fashionable society, and the first to attract women in large numbers. Even the racehorses were fashionable, with ribbons of their owners' colors braided into their manes and tails. Jerome, seeking to emulate the British racing system, also established the American Jockey Club, precursor to the present Jockey Club, formed in 1894.

2002: The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and Breeders' Cup Ltd. introduced a new wager called Head2Head to be unveiled at the World Thoroughbred Championships, Oct. 26, at Arlington Park. The wager challenges bettors to select which of two horses in a given Breeders' Cup race will finish ahead of the other.

1948: Fans at Atlantic City Racecourse filed onto the track after the 3-2 favorite in the fourth race, Even Break, dwelt in the starting gate as the race went off. A total of $71,414 was refunded to the angry crowd of bettors.

 26 1942: The Jockey Club stewards revoked Eddie Arcaro's license for one year after his display of "rough riding" aboard odds-on favorite Occupation in the Cowdin Stakes on Sept. 19. In the Cowdin, Arcaro deliberately drove his horse into another, Breezing Home, knocking his jockey, Vincent Nodarse, into the infield. Nodarse and his mount had crowded Arcaro at the start of the race, almost causing him to be unseated.

 27 1947: Armed, then the world's leading money-winning Thoroughbred, met 1946 Kentucky Derby winner Assault in the first $100,000 winner-take-all match race, held at Belmont Park. Armed earned an easy victory over Assault, who was not in peak racing condition.

1924: In the second his three specially staged International races, the French colt Epinard was again defeated, this time by a nose to Ladkin, at Aqueduct. A crowd of 40,000 witnessed the race.

1894: Aqueduct Racetrack opened its doors. The building was torn down in 1955 and the new Aqueduct was reopened on Sept. 14, 1959.

 28 1996: Jockey Dave Gall had his 7,000th career win, at Fairmount Park aboard A. J. Onray. He was the fourth rider to attain 7,000 wins.

1996: Jockey Lanfranco "Frankie" Dettori won seven-of-seven races at Ascot, a single-day wins record in England. His win streak was estimated to have cost English bookmakers £30 million and to have caused the closing of as many as 40 bookmaking shops, which suffered heavy losses after paying off winning punters.

1983: Atlantic City Racecourse and The Meadowlands became the first U.S. tracks to engage in simulcasting. The previous year, Woodbine and Fort Erie in Canada had been the first to experiment with simulcasting.

1960: Forty years after Man o' War won the Lawrence Realization Stakes by 100 lengths in the record time of 2:40 4/5, Kelso equaled his time in the same event.

 29 1973: With Meadow Stable's Riva Ridge scratched because of rainy weather, his stablemate Secretariat was left to compete in the 1 1/2-mile Woodward Stakes at Belmont Park. Prove Out, trained by Allen Jerkens, beat the 3-10 favorite Secretariat, who faded after 1 1/4 miles to finish second by 4 1/2 lengths. Another Jerkens trainee, Onion, had defeated Secretariat in the Whitney Stakes on Aug. 4 at Saratoga.

 30 1995: Jockey Craig Perret, 44, gained his 4,000th career win, riding Heloise to victory in the eighth race at Turfway Park.

1990: Bill Shoemaker had his first graded stakes win as a trainer when Baldomero (IRE) won the Grade III Golden Harvest Handicap at Louisiana Downs.

1981: Jockey Laffit Pincay Jr. had his 5,000th career win, aboard Wander in the seventh race at Santa Anita Park.

1969: Jockey Kathy Kusner won her first career race, at Pocono Downs. Kusner, a former rider with the U.S. Equestrian Team, had sued to obtain a jockey's license in Maryland in 1968. She won her case but was subsequently sidelined by a broken leg suffered in a training accident.

1922: After a six-year hiatus, racing returned to Chicago with the reopening of Hawthorne Park. The popular gelding Exterminator, winner of the 1918 Kentucky Derby and the then-second-leading money winner of all time, made a special appearance, racing solo against the track-record time of 2:04 3-5 for 1 1-4 miles. He completed the distance in 2:10.

1898: Jockey Tod Sloan rode five consecutive winners at England's Newmarket racecourse.